A pathway for induction-to-English

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A pathway for induction-to-English

Author: Caroline Scott

In cases where you have an absolute beginner to English, an induction-to-English is supportive. Yes, we need to be differentiating for the curriculum content in class too, but let’s help our learners with some of the basics in a regular small group or one-to-one supportive English learning session…

An induction programme (also known as a withdrawal, pull-out, intervention or small-group new-to-English programme) offers initial English support for learners arriving in the English-speaking mainstream with little or no English. Although learners should be present in most mainstream lessons, they can attend a small-group induction class regularly. This kind of group or one-to-one session is designed to help learners to access some of the basic functional English language they need in a welcoming small-group setting whilst providing opportunities for them to feel confident and ready to take risks in language learning. It is intended to support newcomers in feeling safe, settled and valued and to give them a sense of belonging.

Lileikienė and Danilevičienė (2016) found that learners experienced uncomfortable feelings when learning or using a new language. They proved that this anxiety was a powerful predictor for demotivation in language learning and impeded the acquisition of the new language. The research analysis also revealed that the majority of younger respondents demonstrated a higher degree of anxiety. A programme can boost learner confidence in using the language they need to access school life by offering appropriately levelled, relevant content which is fun, engaging, and social for learners with similar levels of English. It can act as a bridge for learners with very limited English to initially:

“‘kickstart’ students’ learning of English and to offer them collective support during their early days and months in an English-medium environment.” (Sears, 2015)

If teachers are required to raise the level of attainment in the curriculum, they need to provide learners with the tools to access the learning.

“Separate or some kind of ‘sheltered’ instruction may also be the best option for recently arrived English language learners” (Gibbons, 2009, see also Carrasquillo and Rodriguez, 2002).

The resource accompanying this article offers a structure for an induction. You can use your own resources to support these topics or use any of the following programmes which are aligned to this resource:

Learning Village

– Teaching English as an Additional Language 5-11: A Whole School Resource, available here

– Teaching Children English as an Additional Language: A Programme for 7-11 year olds, available here

This article is a short extract from Caroline’s new book – out this year!

 

Download the resource accompanying this article by clicking here.

 

References:

Sears, C (2015) Second Language Students in English-Medium Classrooms: A Guide for Teachers in International Schools, Bristol: Multilingual Matters

Gibbons, P. (2009) English Learners, Academic Literacy and Thinking, Heinemann, Portsmouth

Lileikienė and Danilevičienė (2016) Foreign Language Anxiety In Student Learning, Baltic Journal Of Sport & Health Sciences No. 3(102); 2016; 18–23 Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania

Resources:

Learning Village

Teaching English as an Additional Language 5-11: A Whole School Resource, available here

Teaching Children English as an Additional Language: A Programme for 7-11 year olds, available here

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